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Prospectus of the American 
Guano Company 



[BRARY 



THE UNIVERSITY 



OF CALIFORNIA 



LOS ANGELES 





PROSPECTUS 



ANO COMPANY. 



N1-:\V YORK: 
IS F. TROW PRINTER, 53 ANN STREET. 
1855. 



PROSPECTUS 



OF THE 



AMERICAN 



GUANO COMPANY. 



NEW YORK: 

JOHN F. TROW PRINTER, 53 ANN STREET. 
1855, 



American (Stoaiur 



President. Vice-president. 

A. G. BENSON. BEETRAM IT. HOWELL. 

Trustees. 

GEORGE W. BEEBEE, Tiros. G. TALMAGE, 

WILLIAM E. MORRIS, SAMUEL A. ROLLO, 

GEORGE HALL, BERTRAM H. HOWELL, and 

ALFRED G. BENSON. 

Treasurer and Secretary 
JAS. S. WYOKOFF. 




PROSPECTUS, 




The American Guano Company is organized 
under certain articles of agreement and asso- 
ciation, dated New York, the first day of Sep- 
tember, 1855. 

THIS Company own an island in the Pacific Ocean, 
covered with a deposit of more than two hundred 
million tons of ammoniated guano, and 'have de- 
spatched a ship, agent, and men, to maintain possession 
thereof. The capital stock of said company is tenV; 
millions of dollars, and is represented by one hundred/f 
thousand shares, at one hundred dollars a share. Sixty 
thousand shares of said stock have been expended 
to purchase the island, and to despatch the ship before 
mentioned ; and forty thousand shares are appropriated 
as the working capital of the Company, and are placed 
in the hands of Trustees to be sold for the further pro- 
motion of the enterprise. 



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88934.3 



The Trustees now offer for sale twenty thousand 
shares of this stock, at ten dollars ($10) per share, on 
terms made known at the office of the Company. 

The island is described by the discoverer as follows : 

" Its size is about eight miles long, by four miles 
broad. Its shape is crescent, and is quite low and level. 
It has a very good harbor on the westerly side, where 
fifty to one hundred ships of the largest class can safely 
lie and load within fifty feet of the shore. Its forma- 
tion is coral, and it is covered with a deposit, from 
ten to thirty feet deep, the surface of which presents 
a lightish crust in some places, and porous in others. 
There being found thereon no trace of tree, shrub, or 
verdure of any sort, said deposit cannot have arisen 
from any vegetable substance ; while the innumerable 
multitude of birds found there, coupled with the 
pungent smell evolved from their ordure, its color, 
its ashy, impalpable nature, its location in a dry and 
warm latitude, one and all unite to confirm the convic- 
tion that said deposit can fce nothing but one vast bed 
of ammoniated guano." 

Excepting this one, no Guano Island hitherto dis- 
covered possesses the natural advantages of a good 
harbor, safe anchorage, and conveniences to load a 
large number of ships at once. 

At the Chincha Islands there is no harbor, and one 
vessel only can load at a time under the Manguera 
(though lately some have loaded in launches), and yet 
there were exported from that place over four hun- 
dred thousand tons of guano during the past year. 

From the past and present demand for Peruvian 



guano, now selling at fifty-five dollars per ton, it is safe 
to presume that there will be no difficulty when under 
a full and complete business organization, in disposing 
of at least two million tons per annum, at thirty dol- 
lars per ton from the island belonging to this Company, 
because they can load ten ships in the time one is load- 
ed at the Chincha Islands, but not to appear extrava- 
gant, it is proposed to estimate the sales of this com- 
pany the first year after being in full operation at only 
four hundred thousand tons, which sold at thirty (not 
fifty-five) dollars a ton, presents the following result : 

400,000 tons at $30 per ton, is, - $12,000,000 
Shipping expenses per ton, - $2 00 
Freight, - - " " - 18 00 
Insurance, - " " 30 



Commission on sale and in- i 



. . I 

And storage, - - - 2 00 



cidental expenses, 



$24 00 9,600,000 

Leaving a profit for dividend of $2,400,000 

In case the Government of the United States, or 
any other government, should purchase the said island 
and pay for the same, a fixed sum in cash or govern- 
ment stock or agree to pay a specified sum per ton as 
the guano should be mined and shipped then in the 
former case a final dividend would be made pro rata to 
the Stockholders, and the concern wound up ; or in 
the latter case dividends would be made from time to 
time until the entire deposit shall have been exhausted. 



THE ANNEXED EXTRACTS 

SHOW THE GREAT IMPORTANCE ATTACHED TO THIS 
SUBJECT. 



The following Preamble and Kesolutions were una- 
nimously adopted on the 22d June, 1855, at the regular 
meeting of the Farmers' Club of the American Insti- 
tute, of the City of New York, held at the Repository, 
No. 531 Broadway : 

WHEREAS the Peruvian Government has monopolized 
the supply of Guano throughout the United States ; and 

WflEREas, on account of said monopoly, the Farmers of 
this country have heretofore been obliged to pay for said 
article about $50 a ton, and by a recent announcement of 
that Government there is no^prospect hereafter of any re- 
duction, and 

WHEREAS there is reason to believe that islands contain- 
ing large and valuable deposits of ammoniated guano have 
recently been discovered by citizens of the United States, 
who have made application to the Government at Wash- 
ington for protection therein ; and 

WHEREAS, if said protection shall be afforded, the Farm- 
ers of this country will reap the benefit of said fertilizer at 
an advance of but $1 on the freight of the same to our 
shores, instead of an onerous tax of more than $25 per ton 
now paid Peru ; therefore, 

RESOLVED, That it is the duty of the American Govern- 



ment to assert its sovereignty over any and all barren and 
uninhabitable guano islands of the ocean which have been 
or hereafter may be discovered by citizens of the United 
States, and which are situated so far from any continent 
that, according to the laws which govern nations, no other 
power can rightfully exercise jurisdiction over them, and 
to guarantee the right of property therein to the discoverer, 
his successors or assigns, 

RESOLVED, That the Agricultural Societies of the several 
States be invited to concur in the foregoing, and to unite 
in calling upon our Government at Washington and the 
distinguished public men now before the country, for their 
views on this important question. 

RESOLVED, That Bread being the staff of life, its abund- 
ance furnishes the basis of national prosperity. 

RESOLVED, That the foregoing resolutions be printed in 
the form of a circular, signed by the President and Secre- 
tary, and transmitted to the County and State Agricultural 
Societies of the several States, to the President of the 
United States, and heads of departments at Washington. 

ROBERT S. LIVINGSTON, Chairman. 
HENRY MEIGS, Secretary. 



8 



A LATE WRITER SAYS : 

" The commercial enterprise of our country is seek- 
ing out and bringing the treasures of the waters to our 
farms and orchards, in the form of guano perhaps the 
antediluvian remains of the countless myriads that lived 
before the flood. Treasures, indeed rich in the one 
needful thing, without which our labor would be vain, 
our fertile soils a barren waste." 

" The real and only value of all manures, be they 
bones, guano, or barn-yard manure, ashes or city 
sweepings, can be easily estimated, by the percentage 
of ingredients they contain, which the atmosphere or soil 
do not furnish of themselves ; by the quantity of sub- 
stances which the land wants, and not by the quantity 
it does not want, or which it does not receive gratui- 
tously from the atmosphere above it, the cost of labor 
necessary to transport the manure to the land, and to 
make it available." 

FROM A REPORT OJT GUANO, BY DR. URE : 

"Guano, therefore, is found to contain such sub- 
stances, in such proportions, as to surpass very far all 
other species of manure, whether natural or artificial, 
both in the permanency of its action upon the roots of 
plants, and also in giving immediate vigor to vegetation." 

PROFESSOR LIEBIG BELIEVES : 

" That the importation of one hundredweight of 
guano is equivalent to the importation of eight hun- 
dredweight of wheat ; so that one hundredweight of 
guano assumes, with due culture, the form of eight 
hundredweight of substantial food for man." 



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